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AUGUST 25, 2020 //     

Pandemic Sends Us Back to The Future

By: Tracee Larson 

Everything old is new again. This phrase came to mind last week when a local dairy re-started home deliveries. Having been in business since 1916, Portland, Ore.-based Alpenrose Dairy has experienced its fair share of ups and downs in the industry, but the pandemic opened up a new door for it to build up its brand in the area and employ more people as milkmen and milkwomen.

I couldn’t wait to sign up, and my first delivery happened without a hitch. I even received a postcard identifying my milkman by name (Korbin), his hometown (Washougal, Washington), his favorite Alpenrose product (chocolate milk), and a fun fact that his left thumb is double-jointed.

After discovering from relatives that my grandparents also had their milk and dairy products delivered by Alpenrose for more than 20 years starting in the 1940s, I’ve come full circle not only with my milk and cheese, but also with many other products and services that my earlier family members experienced decades earlier – a small, silver lining courtesy of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Equipped with the latest technologies and adhering to all the social distancing and sanitation protocols, I and many others have adopted many of the same habits my grandparents held 70 years ago. With an app or a simple internet connection, I have groceries, pet supplies, furniture and personal items all delivered safely to my doorstep.

Expanding past the doorsteps and into a car, I can once again forgo the expensive concession stand at the movie theater and relish my drinks and snacks of choice at the local drive-in, whether it be a location already set up as one or a “pop-up” version that various retailers and property owners have developed during the pandemic.

While today’s drive-in audiences won’t hear the crackle of AM radio-controlled audio (most of today’s drive-ins use FM frequencies for a much-improved theater experience), there’s a true sense of private space drive-ins offer that cannot be found in a regular theater. No risk of sitting in gum or paying $15 for a tub of popcorn. Movie-goers can wear sweats, PJs or whatever feels most comfortable.

Also, slipping an arm around a date now doesn’t bump up against the legs of the person seated directly behind. And depending on the type of vehicle, watching a movie in lounge chairs from the back of a pickup truck or van delivers a new, delightful experience, with an FM transistor radio situated in between so the vehicle’s battery doesn’t drain down.

This brings back so many fond memories of my grandparents piling my cousins and me into the station wagon for a night at the local drive-in, all of us dressed in our pajamas with one favorite candy selection (I was a sucker for the Lik-m-aid/Fun Dips because they lasted longer) and plenty of popcorn. I was fortunate enough to still have a couple of drive-ins around while in high school, with a bunch of us piled into a friend’s Ford pick-up truck with sleeping bags to watch the movie “Red Dawn” when it first premiered, armed with Sony Walkmans tuned into the AM frequency and sharing headphones with our dates.

Another rediscovered experience from the past has been road trips. With airport travel dramatically reduced due to the pandemic and gas prices at affordable levels, what better way to get out of the house (now the epicenter of work, school, and regular life for many Americans) than to pile into the car and hit the open road.

I haven’t owned a car since 2004. But since the pandemic reared its ugly head in March, I’ve driven more than 1,500 miles in rental cars and rediscovered the wonderful sights in the Pacific Northwest. Long drives listening to whatever music strikes my fancy as I maneuver a low-mileage car through mountain roads and historic highways provides a sense of relaxation no airplane or train trip can deliver.

A recent article in The Economist, “Mid-century modern,” expanded on some other activities commonly done in years past (trips to state parks and breaking out those board games that can be played anywhere) that have emerged more popular than ever in a pandemic world. People still hide behind their phones as a way to socially distance themselves and feed their information addiction. But some have started setting aside their technological devices to experience many of the delights and comforts their parents and grandparents did in years past, even as we wear face masks and use plenty of hand sanitizer to stay safe.

The final silver lining to be found, particularly in urban centers, is re-establishing relationships with neighbors. With so many folks now working from home or unemployed due to the pandemic, people now see more of their neighbors, introduce themselves (how many of us in large cities can say we know all of the people living on their block or in their apartment building) and watch out for each other – much like folks did back in the 1950s. We make meals in our Instant Pots to take to neighbors who might have lost jobs, throw together parking lot parties (wearing masks of course) to celebrate the start of a new season, or commiserate outside on properly distanced porches about the possible postponement of professional sport seasons (still holding out for the NFL to start on time.)

Now more than ever, everything old has become new again, as younger generations take pleasure in “new” activities while some of us relive memories of former, less complex times. As the September approaches, it’s time to look up the local drive-in theater features, pop a bunch of corn, throw on the comfy sweats and slippers, and head out for that final taste of a summer from a truly unforgettable year.

But don’t dress too comfy – be sure to visit the concession stand to keep these drive-ins open for many more to experience. Some trends don’t necessarily need to go out-of-style again.

Tracee Larson is an account manager in the Corporate + Public Affairs Practice at Allison+Partners, working with B2B clients across multiple industries and regions. Currently working from home in Portland, Oregon, she’s starting to losing the battle with her cats taking over team calls and video chats.

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